<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2800.1126" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>
<DIV>Bush Proposal May Cut Tax on S.U.V.'s for Business 
<DIV>January 21, 2003 
<DIV>By DANNY HAKIM  
<DIV>
<DIV>DETROIT, Jan. 20 - The Bush administration's economic plan 
<DIV>would increase by 50 percent or more the deductions that 
<DIV>small-business owners can take right away on the biggest 
<DIV>sport utility vehicles and pickups. 
<DIV>
<DIV>The plan would mean small businesses could immediately 
<DIV>deduct the entire price of S.U.V.'s like the Hummer H2, the 
<DIV>Lincoln Navigator and the Toyota Land Cruiser, even if the 
<DIV>vehicles were loaded with every available option. Or a 
<DIV>business owner, taking full advantage, could buy a BMW X5 
<DIV>sport utility vehicle for a few hundred dollars more than a 
<DIV>Pontiac Bonneville sedan, after the immediate tax 
<DIV>deductions were factored in. 
<DIV>
<DIV>Tax experts and environmentalists say the plan would 
<DIV>provide incentives for businesses to choose the biggest 
<DIV>gas-guzzling trucks because it takes several years to 
<DIV>depreciate the cost of passenger cars and smaller sport 
<DIV>utility vehicles. The ramifications of the Bush plan on 
<DIV>S.U.V. buyers were reported today in The Detroit News. 
<DIV>
<DIV>The potential lift for sales of big S.U.V.'s comes amid 
<DIV>rising tension in the Middle East and increasing criticism 
<DIV>of S.U.V.'s from environmentalists and regulators. 
<DIV>
<DIV>But a top budget official said today that the 
<DIV>administration might be open to changes in the tax code 
<DIV>that would bring cars more in line with big trucks. 
<DIV>
<DIV>"We have an open mind about whether the deduction for cars 
<DIV>needs to be refined," said Dr. John Graham, the 
<DIV>administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory 
<DIV>Affairs in the Office of Management and Budget. 
<DIV>
<DIV>The tax code now caps deductions for most automobiles. But 
<DIV>the largest vehicles - those that weigh more than 6,000 
<DIV>pounds fully loaded - are exempt because the relevant 
<DIV>portion of the code was written in the 1980's, before the 
<DIV>rise of the sport utility vehicle, and was intended to 
<DIV>exempt big pickups needed on work sites. Now the tax 
<DIV>incentives also give business owners not involved in 
<DIV>hauling - doctors, real estate agents, accountants - more 
<DIV>incentive to buy the biggest S.U.V.'s instead of smaller 
<DIV>ones, or cars. 
<DIV>
<DIV>The proposal "makes a glitch in the tax code much worse and 
<DIV>it benefits rich businessmen who want to buy massive 
<DIV>S.U.V.'s," said Aileen Roder, program director for 
<DIV>Taxpayers for Common Sense. "In essence we're buying these 
<DIV>vehicles for these businesses." 
<DIV>
<DIV>But the administration says that greater business 
<DIV>deductions will be a potent economic stimulant. 
<DIV>
<DIV>"Many small businesses have genuine needs for large vans, 
<DIV>pickups and S.U.V.'s, whether it be for a farm, sales or 
<DIV>industrial application," Dr. Graham said. "An updated tax 
<DIV>deduction for small businesses is certainly needed." 
<DIV>
<DIV>Consider the Hummer H1 as an example of the new deduction. 
<DIV>It is one of the largest and most expensive S.U.V.'s, with 
<DIV>a base sticker price of $102,581, including destination 
<DIV>charge. Under the Bush plan, small-business owners could 
<DIV>use all of an annual $75,000 capital equipment deduction 
<DIV>toward the purchase; the current equipment deduction 
<DIV>allowance is just $25,000. 
<DIV>
<DIV>That is in addition to thousands of dollars in other 
<DIV>deductions. Under existing rules, a business could deduct 
<DIV>30 percent from the base price left after the capital 
<DIV>equipment deduction, a benefit put in place as part of a 
<DIV>post-Sept. 11 stimulus package. In the case of the H1, that 
<DIV>would be a further deduction of $8,274. 
<DIV>
<DIV>Finally, 20 percent could be deducted from what is left, 
<DIV>part of the business deductions available for automobiles. 
<DIV>For the H1, that would be $3,861 more in deductions. 
<DIV>
<DIV>The total would be more than $87,000 in deductions, or 
<DIV>about $33,500 in savings in federal taxes alone for buyers 
<DIV>in the highest bracket. Under current rules, just less than 
<DIV>$60,000 could be deducted. 
<DIV>
<DIV>Deals for cars and small sport utility vehicles are much 
<DIV>less appealing. Currently, a business can deduct no more 
<DIV>than $7,660 for a car in its first year of service, $4,900 
<DIV>in the second year and less in the succeeding years. The 
<DIV>Toyota Prius, which uses a fuel-efficient blend of gasoline 
<DIV>and electric power, is eligible for an additional $2,000 
<DIV>clean vehicle deduction. That means a business owner could 
<DIV>deduct under half of the $20,500 sticker price of the Prius 
<DIV>in the first year of purchase, for about $3,700 worth of 
<DIV>federal tax savings for those in the highest tax bracket. 
<DIV>
<DIV>David Friedman, an engineer and analyst at the Union of 
<DIV>Concerned Scientists, an environmental group, said the 
<DIV>increased deduction for big vehicles was "yet another 
<DIV>loophole that the government is keeping open that is 
<DIV>increasing our oil dependence." 
<DIV>
<DIV>"Before, it was large enough to drive a small S.U.V. 
<DIV>through," he added. "Now it's large enough to drive a 
<DIV>Hummer through." 
<DIV>
<DIV>Without altering the treatment of cars in the tax code, the 
<DIV>Bush plan could run counter to the administration's recent 
<DIV>decision to force automakers to improve the fuel economy of 
<DIV>S.U.V.'s, pickups and minivans by 7 percent by middecade. 
<DIV>
<DIV>That is probably why the administration is open minded when 
<DIV>it comes to reviewing the tax treatment of different kinds 
<DIV>of vehicles. 
<DIV>
<DIV>Dr. Graham reiterated today that the administration was 
<DIV>also considering further fuel economy measures. S.U.V.'s 
<DIV>and pickups that weigh more than 8,500 pounds fully loaded 
<DIV>have been exempt from federal fuel regulations. But the 
<DIV>administration "is currently investigating whether those 
<DIV>rules should be extended to larger light trucks" weighing 
<DIV>as much as 10,000 pounds, he said. 
<DIV>
<DIV><A 
href="http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/21/business/21AUTO.html?ex=1044215665&ei=1&en=c9eefda9bd5e5ca6" 
target=_blank>http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/21/business/21AUTO.html?ex=1044215665&ei=1&en=c9eefda9bd5e5ca6</A> 

<DIV>
<DIV></DIV><BR><BR><BR></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>